The Last Words of Anton Lavey

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The Last Words of Anton Lavey

The Last Words of Anton Lavey 

If you have ever read Anton Lavey’s “The Devil’s Notebook,” you’ve probably been intrigued by His Satanist philosophy. Perhaps you’ve read his colorful background or wondered about the adulterous lifestyle he led. If you haven’t, we’ve gathered some of the most relevant facts about this controversial author. 

Anton Lavey, a well-known Satanist, said his final words, “What did I do, what’s wrong?” as he described the final moments of his life. He is the author of the Satanic Bible and the founder of the First Church of Satan. Anton Lavey’s final comments showed how, at the last moment, he was scared to understand that he had been duped by the devil and was now facing an eternity in hell.

The Satanic Bible, published by Anton Lavey in 1969, is the major document describing the Satanic church’s doctrines and principles. It is the Satanists’ authoritative text, but it is not regarded as a sacred text in the same way that the Bible is for Christians.

Keep reading for the most interesting facts and lessons about the man. But be aware that Anton Lavey was not a Christian and didn’t worship God. He was a Satanist and did not believe in the Holy Bible, yet his spiritual bond with the devil still attracts millions of people to him. Unless redeemed by faith in Christ, Anton Lavey would have surely ended up in hell.

His Satanist philosophy

In Anton Lavey’s Satanist philosophy, Satan is a dark force that motivates mankind, a “Black Flame”. It represents our inner personality, desires, and urges. Moreover, he represents nature and the supreme deity. While Satan is not a god, the philosophy is based on the notion that Satan performs the functions of God, and that human worship and spiritual focus should be directed at him.

The concept of being one’s own god is a central tenet of Satanism. A Satanist can act upon their wills and instincts, while also espousing affection and wrath. The key, however, is to accept and justify all of their actions. In LaVey’s view, the intellectuals spent too much time attempting to please psychic vampires, who demanded attention and never gave it back.

Although LaVey never directly referred to Satan as a “devil”, he described Satan as a ‘false god’. His Satanism was inspired by his observation of burlesque men in church. In addition to being atheistic, LaVey also identified Satan as the opposition between God and Satan. This contrast would lead to the ‘ethical’ man vs. the “devil” in the struggle of hypocrisy and indulgence.

Objectivism and Satanism share much in common. Both philosophy systems promote selfishness and atheism, and view Christianity, Islam, and Judaism as anti-human and evil. Ayn Rand is an influential writer, whose book Anthem makes Satanism more accessible to mainstream readers. So, if you’re curious about whether Satanism is for you, read the following.

His colorful background

Many people wonder if the colorful background of author Anton Lavey has anything to do with his books. LaVey claimed a number of different occupations, including psychic investigator, police photographer, burlesque organist, lion tamer, and even lover of Marilyn Monroe. He also claimed to play the oboe in the San Francisco Ballet Symphony. He later resigned from these positions in order to pursue writing full time.

The colorful background of Anton Lavey reveals his fascination with pulp magazines, horror movies, and other popular culture. His family consisted of Russian, German, and Ukrainian immigrants. He also claimed Gypsy and Transylvanian descent. Although his family background was extremely diverse, he still had an affinity for Universal monster films and pulp magazines. It is believed that LaVey’s fascination with satanic iconography owed something to the 1934 Boris Karloff-Bela Lugosi chiller The Black Cat.

His adulterous lifestyle

In the 1960s, at the height of the free-love movement, Anton Lavey left his successful carnival career to join the Church of Satan and start a new life. This new religion, dubbed the Church of Satan, has its roots in Lavey’s own twisted philosophy. He began holding dark masses in medieval costumes and carnival pomp. His lust for sexuality, in particular, was uncontrollable.

His book The Devil’s Notebook

The Devil’s Notebook by Anton Lavey is a grimoire. LaVey founded the Church of Satan and wrote this grimoire to further his ideas of depravity and evil. He speculated on nonconformity, erotic politics, demoralization, and the construction of artificial human companions. In this grimoire, LaVey honed in on humankind’s limitless capacity for self-deception. He included instructions on creating total environments, and he also referred to magical evocation as a means to achieve these goals.

The Devil’s Notebook was published by Feral House in 1991. The book is a satire on the religious and political beliefs of modern day society and contains a plethora of illustrations and a scathing commentary on the nature of evil. Lavey’s writings have attracted a large audience and have been translated into several languages. The Devil’s Notebook was featured in Rolling Stone magazine in 1991.

His death

Anton Szandor LaVey, the founder of the Church of Satan and a former devil-in-a-baby in Roman Polanksi’s 1968 film Rosemary’s Baby, died on October 29, 1997, of pulmonary edema. The cause of his death was unclear, but he died after suffering from several years of heart and lung disease. His death was not publicly announced, as the family kept it a secret for over a week.

LaVey had been a Roman Catholic since he was a teenager, and it was only after the Manson Family’s murders that he became a Satanist. While he never explicitly denied his beliefs, he never denied the existence of Satan. He considered Jesus to be a myth that repulsed him, and he wanted to be buried as a Satanic. His death is the result of a long and difficult battle between the Church of Satan and evangelical Christianity.

There is much controversy surrounding LaVey’s death, and it remains unclear if his daughter was the sole responsible party. Although the daughter claimed to have arranged his funeral, the death certificate was not signed by her father or other relatives. It is also unclear if the funeral was attended by anyone other than LaVey’s family. Regardless of whether the death certificate was signed by LaVey or a Christian, it is clear that there are a number of conspiracy theories surrounding his death.

His legacy

Though his death in 2001 was widely publicized, Anton LaVey’s legacy is not as well-known as one would have hoped. Many of his projects remain incomplete, and the man’s obituary was published around the world. The next day, his daughter filed for probate. His death was followed by divorce and bankruptcy proceedings. Wright’s investigations revealed inconsistencies in the legend.

While LaVey’s organization made public many of his personal details, he refused to engage in public debates over Satanic Ritual Abuse, or the growing popularity of witchcraft. His followers, many of them imitators, were dismissed as posers and devoid of original interpretations or insights. Sadly, this was the fate of countless would-be high priests. Ultimately, the world of Satan was a better place without him.

Many of his writings have been controversial. He published The Disinformation Company Ltd. dossier, “Tree of Set”, and several biographies. His aesthetics and worldview have permeated many forms of popular culture, including music and film. He also influenced the arts and politics. Some consider his work to be a legacy. And the apocalypse isn’t the only cult LaVey left behind.

The Church of Satan’s core scriptures were first written by Anton LaVey, and the Church of Satan’s cult does not claim to be the only organization that has influenced the religion. Several other mystical works have been published by Satanists, but none can challenge The Satanic Bible. A more accurate description of the religion would be to recognize the Satanic Bible as the first true occult book.