A Right Is Unenumerated If It Is?

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A Right Is Unenumerated If It Is?

A Right Is Unenumerated If It Is?

Undeniable rights are legal rights that cannot be taken away from others in any form. These are rights that cannot be chosen or changed. They already exist, whether or not they have been written down as laws. While others may decide to grant you these rights, if they do not live before being presented, then you still have no way of claiming them for yourself. 

In this way, the existence of absolute rights is the ‘glue’ that holds societies together because everyone shares these basic human needs. Therefore, these basic human needs are stored in common by all humans regardless of their culture or language, location or environment, wealth or poverty, age or race.

Unenumerated rights are legal rights inferred from other rights implied by existing laws, such as in written constitutions. Still, they are not expressly coded or “enumerated” within the explicit writ of the law. Alternative terminology sometimes used are implied/natural, background, and fundamental rights.

This word is used to mean any natural or intrinsic rights (such as those that pertain to a person inherently without the need for explanation or justification — such as the right to live, to exist, and to pursue happiness) without expression or instance of articulation.

While unenumerated rights include the right to travel or privacy, enumerated rights include:

  • Freedom of speech.
  • Freedom of religion.
  • The right to bear arms.
  • The right to a fair trial.

No One Knows Exactly What Rights an American Has

Some rights are left open for interpretation because they are presented ambiguously. There is also no specific way to know which the Constitution protects unenumerated rights and whether or not any of your constitutional rights have been violated

For example, according to Article IV Section 2 of the American Constitution, “No person held to service or labor in one state, under the laws thereof, escaping into another, shall… be discharged from such service or labor”.

The ruling of this passage assumes that people who have escaped having slavery imposed on them do not have a right to die because it suggests that until you’ve been granted freedom, you might run back and resume your place as an enslaved person.

What Enumerated Rights Does an American Have Under the Constitution?

The First Amendment is one in the Bill of Rights, one of the five rings that form a binder (in book format) known as the Constitution. When the people who created this country realized they needed more forms of protection from an overreaching government. 

It was decided that each citizen should have certain things guaranteed to them to protect their rights. This is where amendments such as freedom of speech and assembly came in handy for ensuring equality between different social classes.

The First Amendment

The First Amendment protects the freedom of speech. We can use our words to say controversial things that may not be popular with many people or have a controversial opinion that might be shocking to some people if expressed in public because it runs against standard norms. 

People may also go so far as to organize themselves into groups and publicly demonstrate other forms of books to the government in what is known as a protest without causing any harm or public disorder. 

This amendment has many uses in society and can protect us from unfair treatment by corporations and governments, who otherwise would have been allowed by this country’s governing laws to terminate our services without due cause.

Second Amendment

The Second Amendment lets Americans bear arms. The U.S. Constitution’s Bill of Rights protects the right to bear arms with the amendment’s Second Amendment advocated by gun-rights advocates, which defines a qualified privilege that is not absolute and encompasses components kept by individuals and militias (not necessarily standing armies) as well as those stored in armories or arsenals. 

Suppose a gun-control measure makes it through Congress. In that case, it likely faced much opposition from voters for whom guns are often personal, identifying parts of their culture and identity even though changes could prevent mass violence.

In Australia

Rights that the government can not deny a citizen are explicitly stated in the Constitution. Rights such as freedom of speech, assembly, and action are all listed under the first amendment. The government is also forbidden from taking your property for public use without offering a fair price. 

So, if you’re at home or work to find out your house or business has been taken by eminent domain- you’re well within your rights to fight it. Laws like these were made when our founding fathers feared what could happen to their liberties if they did not protect them once this republic was founded.

The court has found that the right to free speech is in line with the Constitution’s implied rights. And this discovery is related to a prisoner’s voting rights. In Roach v Electoral Commissioner, it was ruled that a law within New South Wales that disallowed all prisoners from being able to vote legally was a violation of the Human Rights Act, hence why charges were made against them by one of Australia’s highest courts.

In United States

The United States of America are well known for its many freedoms. The rights that cannot be found in the Constitution but which can be located in the heart of every American: to keep personal matters private and have a married couple have a secret between themselves; are some of those traditional values this country stands for, with everybody’s right to personal privacy and exercising their freedom towards happiness is exercised with keeping abuses undercover by their own will.

The United States Constitution remains a cornerstone of the American legal system. During times of change, the tendency is to take away everyone’s rights to remove the disorder. What began as a necessary measure will have wrought unintended consequences. 

It is incumbent upon those who wish to see progress to recognize the freedom and value those who would rather die than see it limited even further. Life indeed imitates art, and stories repeat themselves through history generations later.