Why Are The Police Called The Five-O or 50?

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Why Are The Police Called The Five-O?

Why Are The Police Called The Five-O?

Ever wondered why the police are called The Five-O? Maybe you have seen the films ‘Smokey and the Bandit,’ ‘Hawaii Five-O,’ or ‘Chin Ho’, but did you know that the term originates from the police department in the 50th state? Read on to learn more. After all, they are the ones who catch criminals, right?

”Hawaii Five-O”

CBS books the new series of the classic “Hawaii Five-O” crime drama, starring Alex O’Loughlin as Detective Steve McGarrett, Scott Caan as Detective Danno, and Tani Rey as a fresh-faced police academy graduate. Together, this brash group of cops takes on the seedy underworld of the 50th state.

”Hawaii Five O” was a local show filmed in Honolulu. Despite the show’s success, the cast was largely comprised of local actors. For example, Kam Fong Chun, who worked for the Honolulu Police Department for 18 years before he began acting, played Chin Ho Kelly for ten seasons. Gilbert “Zoulou” Kauhi played the part of Kono Kalakaua for five years. Others who played major roles include Al Harrington and Herman Wedemeyer.

Hawaii Five-O was a hit show in Hawaii that aired from 1968 to 1980. The logo of the show has become synonymous with Hawaii. Even the University of Hawaii marching band performs its theme song during home games. The show was filmed in Hawaii, with occasional use of Los Angeles studios and other locations. The show has been available for over three decades on television and DVD. You can view the series by visiting the CBS website.

”Smokey and the Bandit”

In 1977, Big Enos, the owner of a trucking company, wants his crew to drink Coors at a truck show. However, it was illegal east of the Mississippi River, so Big Enos hired truck driver Bo “Bandit” Darville to pick up the beer and drive it to Georgia in just 28 hours. Along the way, he picks up hitchhiker Carrie, and soon finds himself attracting the attention of Sheriff Buford T. Justice, who is enraged that Carrie will not marry his son.

Smokey and the Bandit is a 1977 American road action comedy film starring Burt Reynolds and Sally Field. The film is set in a small town in Texas and stars Burt Reynolds and Sally Field. It’s a classic American road movie full of crashes, chases, and pratfall humor. Burt Reynolds and Sally Field are both incredibly charming and bring a lot of fun to the film.

Smokey and the Bandit is a Pontiac fan favorite and catapulted director Hal Needham to A-list status. This film is still a hit today, and has a nearly 30-year shelf-life. HOT ROD had the chance to talk with Needham and get the scoop on the film’s legacy. We found him to be down-to-earth and easy-going, just like the characters in the movie.

”50th state”

The term ”50th state” is sometimes applied to countries that are either candidates for statehood or parts of existing states. The term can be positive or negative, depending on the context. A positive meaning would indicate a country’s alignment with the United States. On the other hand, a negative meaning implies a country’s over-involvement in American military and political affairs. The term is also sometimes used to refer to areas under the influence of the United States.

When discussing the future of the United States, some politicians have used the term ”51st state” to suggest that Canada should be given statehood. In fact, when the US made the decision to give Alaska statehood, the nation acknowledged the valuable contributions of the Hawaiian people. Many of the Hawaiians were of Japanese descent, and the US government welcomed them to the US as citizens. Because of the important role of the islands, the United States officially designated Hawaii as its 50th state.

The process to gain statehood for Hawaii has been fraught with controversy. While many Democrats favored the idea of making Alaska the 49th state, Republicans sought to make Hawaii the 50th state alone. As a result, the decision to admit Hawaii as the 50th state has the potential to influence votes in Congress. The Senate has been stalled many times, but it eventually passed by a 76-15 bipartisan vote, despite opposition from several southerners and John Butler of Maryland. In the House, the tally was 323-85.

”Chin Ho”

Chin Ho Kelly is a fictional character from the television series Hawaii Five-O. He was first portrayed by Kam Fong in the original series from 1968 until 1978. In 2010, Daniel Dae Kim starred in the reboot. While Chin Ho isn’t a real person, his story is based on the real-life adventures of a police detective. The actor was born in Hong Kong and grew up in Hawaii.

During the show, Chin Ho’s relationship with Laura Hills was portrayed as somewhat ambiguous. The episode opened with two people telling him that Laura Hills had hots for him. Laura was the governor’s liaison, but there had never been any hint of romance. Chin Ho was quick to shoot her, and she was later killed by Wo Fat’s men. Although Chin Ho wasn’t shown showing any emotion following Laura’s death, fans didn’t know for sure whether she was his girlfriend or not.

Chin was once a police officer, but was then transferred to a federal prison after he killed a woman. He later returned to his police role, but was suspended for three years. Chin was released from prison and reinstated to a rank. His badge was also returned. However, Chin was a prisoner of war and was a wanted man for some time. In the meantime, the two reunited and Chin was reunited with Steve.

”Bobby”

If you have ever heard of the ”Bobby” rap song, you’ve heard the slang nickname for police. The police force has been the subject of many monikers, from “Bobby” to “The Five-O.” Some are funny, some are rude, and some are just plain mean. This show is no exception.

The word bobby is a colloquial term for members of the London Metropolitan Police. The term derives from the name of Sir Robert Peel, the man who founded the Metropolitan Police in 1829. Since then, police officers have also become known as “peelers.”

”Smokey”

A law enforcement officer who is referred to as ”Smokey” is sometimes referred to as a ”bear” in popular lingo. The term originates from the Spanish word for ”ugly,” and is exclusive to the Dominican and Puerto Rican communities in Philadelphia and New York City. The term originated as a mascot for the volunteer militia of Tennessee, as Andrew Jackson often took his pet bear, named Smokey, on recruiting tours and parades.

The phrase ”Smokey” is not uncommon in police circles. It originated in French and is a common slang term for law enforcement. The word ”ecilop” also refers to a pimple. It was popularized in the 1970s by a movie starring Burt Reynolds, which was called Smokey and the Bandit.

Aside from ”Smokey”, there are many other police nicknames. Some are derived from movies and TV shows. In Sweden, a police officer is known as Byling, while in Turkey, he is referred to as Ayna. Another term is ”Japsae,” which refers to the Korean word ”japsae.’ In Japan, police officers are also referred to as ”Smokey,” while in China, a cop is known as a ”Tiaozi”.

”Pa Make Loa”

If you haven’t seen “Pa Make Loa” yet, you’re missing out. The title of this episode is Hawaiian for “Touch of Death,” which is fitting considering the show’s tropical setting. But before you buy tickets for this movie, here are some things to know. First, ‘Pa Make Loa” hasn’t received many critic reviews. Visit Rotten Tomatoes to see what other people thought of it.

This episode of Hawaii Five-0 is the twenty-first episode of Season Two, as well as the 45th episode overall. This episode is also the first part of the two-part crossover episode between Hawaii Five-0 and NCIS: Los Angeles. In the episode, a Hawaii Five-0 team needs the help of the NCIS counterterrorism team, and sends two agents to the island. When they arrive, they discover a bomb-making operation in a man’s house, and Bryan Palmer bangs on the window, demanding access.