What does boruto mean in Naruto Anime and Manga? Is he bad

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What does boruto mean

What does boruto mean? Is he bad

He chose “Naruto” as the character’s name in honor of a ramen topping known as kamaboko, which is a sliced stick with a pink whirlpool-like shape in the center. Ramen was the character’s favorite cuisine in the series, which is why he selected this name.

Some positive points about Boruto related to its Karma Powers

  • Ninjutsu Absorption:

Because Karma has the power to take chakra from its user’s body, it’s safe to assume that it can also absorb Ninjutsu chakra. Any Karma user can absorb ninjutsu that is thrown at them.

This is another Otsutsuki clan member ability that the Karma seal bestows on people who wear it. This power has been used by Boruto Uzumaki, Jigen, and Kawaki throughout the series. The absorbed chakra is most likely retained in the user’s body and added to their own pool, much like with chakra absorption.

  • Flight:

The ability to fly is one of the key talents that Karma bestows on its users. Although not available in the first stage of Boruto Uzumaki’s control, the second level of the Karma allows the user to fly, as Jigen and later Boruto Uzumaki demonstrated.

It’s unclear whether this power is available at the first stage after mastering Karma. In any case, this is one of the most unique abilities that Karma bestows on its users, and given that the larger foes, such as the Otsutsuki, are all capable of flight, this ability appears to be extremely useful.

  • Enhanced Physical Ability:

The most powerful ability that Karma bestows on its users is most likely a significant physical boost. Boruto Uzumaki was able to battle his father to some extent after using this power, demonstrating how deadly it is. It also allowed Kawaki to deal with Jonin-level dangers that even Konohamaru couldn’t handle.

Physical powers are heightened to their utmost optimum in Karma stage 2, and even Boruto becomes as powerful as a full-fledged member of the Otsutsuki clan. Boruto Uzumaki was recently observed using the Karma stage 2 to defeat Boro in a matter of moves, demonstrating just how powerful it is. It will be the same for both Boruto and Kawaki, according to Jigen, which is why he is so interested in both of them.

  • Energy Blast:

This technique, which has only been used by Kawaki thus far, allows him to create a tremendous explosion from his Karma seal that is capable of destroying anybody in its path. This tactic was first employed against Garou, and then against Boro. On both occasions, it was able to inflict significant damage on the adversary.

Because Kawaki hasn’t learned how to correctly use chakra, it’s quite likely that the energy used to create this blast comes from the chakra that was absorbed by Karma in the first place. Kawaki is also the only one who has used this skill thus far.

  • Jigen’s Ability:

This extraordinary power, which is unique to Jigen, allows him to instantly adjust objects, including himself, down to microscopic levels, making him extremely deadly in battle. The objects that have shrunk in size can be returned to their original size fairly instantly, making defeating him nearly impossible.

Even Naruto Uzumaki and Sasuke Uchiha found it difficult to overcome Jigen’s skill. Despite its simplicity, it is quite probably one of the most lethal powers we’ve seen so far in the series. Kawaki should be able to wield this power in the future, but Isshiki must be totally turned over to him first.

Some Negative points about Boruto

  • Boruto’s Overpowered Abilities:

Naruto was always powerful, despite his efforts to hone it. Boruto, on the other hand, is on another level. Despite his lack of interest in shinobi life and the Hokage title, he is definitely one of the most talented pupils in his class.

Boruto enjoys winning and being powerful in the best of circumstances, but his power is expanding rapidly in comparison to his father.

Not to mention, his Karma markings give his power levels an insanely powerful and currently unexpected element. Naruto grew into a great Shinobi, but Boruto seemed to be on an entirely different level, to the point of absurdity.

  • Boruto’s Character Development Is Inadequate:

Boruto, being the series’ main character, displays a striking lack of character development. Naruto’s title character had a long journey ahead of him. He was disobedient but lonely, gifted but erratic, brave but arrogant. Boruto, on the other hand, has a lot less internal strife than Naruto. He’s defiant, but he’s got a lot of friends.

Boruto’s disputes are mostly external rather than internal. They can usually only be dealt with in a timely manner or by relying on others to change as well. As a result, his development is less obvious and progresses, making him less interesting as a character.

  • Boruto’s Lack Of Likable Goals:

Boruto’s aims are unlikable until he develops closer to Sarada and sets the goal of becoming her guardian, the same way Sasuke is for Naruto. Despite being the protagonist, he is a combative and angst-ridden individual. His sole ambition is to become the polar opposite of his father.

His support for Sarada is the first step toward something bigger. However, it isn’t until over 40 episodes into the series that this goal is fulfilled. Until then, he’s filled with hatred for his father, to the point where his persona becomes irrationally furious and flat.

  • Boruto Agreeing To Team 7:

In the original series, Team 7 was the legendary trio of Sakura, Sasuke, and Naruto. Boruto, Sarada, and Mitsuki are grouped together as a team after graduating from Ninja Academy. They were formerly known as Team 3, but Sarada requested that they be renamed Team 7 when she was blown away by Naruto. Her wish has been granted.

However, there is one major drawback to resurrecting the name: Boruto. Boruto has grown to like and appreciate Sarada, but he still has issues with his father and despises the idea of following in his footsteps. It’s a tremendous betrayal of his character for him to join Team 7.

Conclusion:

So we analyze that Because of Boruto’s higher quality, it’s easier to overlook flaws, but it doesn’t mean they don’t exist. We conclude that boruto isn’t too good nor too bad.